P.Wharton

Shrine of sorts

 

Little shrines in drawers.

Stockport Open Exhibition 2019

 

 

 

Every item in this two drawer assemblage holds deep rooted sentiment in all its stages. From childhood to present day. 

 

What sparked this piece was the deep sense of betrayal many of these items can impose upon us just thinking about passing them on.  It hurts as much to keep them as it would to give them away. So we put them away until, I suppose,eventually down the line sentiment eases. A worthy cause? Perhaps value becomes a lifeline. Or you die.

 

When my sister died, aged 32, her mirror became my mother’s most prized, heartfelt possession. As did my mother's spectacles to me. 

 

It was the day before Mother’s Day. My mother was in hospital. I removed her glasses and she asked, "what are you doing?"  "I’m cleaning your glasses. I’m not having my mother with fingerprints all over her glasses". I wiped them and affectionately put them back on her. My mother said gently, "it doesn’t matter". 

 

The day after, she died. I must admit, some time later I found myself drawn to look through them to somehow draw from that very moment she looked at me through them, and it was so deeply heartfelt; as I’m now sure my sister’s mirror was to my mother when she looked into it. 

 

Although we draw deeply the past from these things, it’s not so much the things we have of them that define us, as much as it is the life we live for them. You live for them as they live through you. It’s ok to enjoy every moment for them. 

 

Of course there are still very dark days ahead.  I don’t believe loss gets easier as much as we learn to live around it, but since assembling this piece, the mantra, it’s ok; live for me; love you x, plays throughout my memories of these items. 

 

Live and love for them as they live through you. 

Very best wishes. Philip. 8/2017

 

 

Get involved.

 

Whether it be collectables, deities, things. Have yours included here. send to shrines@boxroom17.net 

 

 

A cuff link, a necklace some brooches, some buttons and stuff, a candle and shoe  that look like they came out of a Christmas cracker many years ago.  But when each drawer is opened the memory floods out.  xxx

 

 

Images copyright Kath.

 

 

These 3 statues were in the reception area of the dentist we went to yesterday. Left to right: 1st guy - Phước. His name means all the rewards we receive for living a good life (we can't think of the right word in English). Middle guy. Lộc - His name means luck. 3rd guy. Thọ - His name means longevity.

 

 

Thanks again Tram and Matthew from Vietnam. 

 

 

 

Images copyright Tram and Matthew.Vietnam.

 

 

 

Thank you so much Dorotheaand Axel Stockmar from Berlin for sharing such a personal, heartfelt part of your life.

 

Images copyright Dorotheaand Axel Stockmarfrom Berlin.

 

 

Vietnam

 

Thank you, Tram and Matthew from Vietnam for these photographs and description ofÔng Địa, the god of land and ông Thần Tài, the god of wealth. Full name: bàn thờ Ông Địa và Thần Tài

 

Images copyright Tram and Matthew.Vietnam

 

 

 

My little shrine.